Arts Council of Wales | Lottery Capital Programme: Major Capital Projects – Additional Guidance Notes

Lottery Capital Programme: Major Capital Projects – Additional Guidance Notes

Contents

Introduction

How to use the Additional Guidance Notes

The Three Stage Application Process

Our specialist external advisers

Your Feasibility Study

Developing your project

Our Requirements for Major Capital Projects

Environmental sustainability

Quality of design and construction

Procurement

Working with artists and craftspeople

Organisational health check

Independent project management

Financial Planning

If we award you a grant

Monitoring your project

Useful Organisations and Publications


Introduction

Welcome to our Major Capital Projects Additional Guidance Notes.

Embarking on a major capital project with the Arts Council is a long-term commitment for your organisation, and we understand that the process and requirements can at times be daunting. This Guidance aims to help you by providing an overview of the process we follow when developing major capital projects.

We know that all major capital projects are different. However, we have certain expectations that we require all projects to address satisfactorily. These requirements are also set out in this Guidance, and you should consider them at all stages of your project’s development.

Major Capital Projects are important schemes for the Arts Council too, and we want them to be exemplary. We want to be closely involved in the development and planning of your project, and we will provide you with advice and support that is specific to you project as it progresses.

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How to use the Additional Guidance Notes

These Additional Guidance Notes assume that you have completed the Project Registration process and we have invited you to apply for funding. If this is not the case, please read more about registering your project in the General Guide to the Arts Council of Wales Lottery Programme.

This Guidance should be read as a "stand-alone" document at the outset of your project to provide you with an overview. You should revisit specific sections as you progress through the process to ensure you do not lose sight of key issues which we will expect you to have considered.

You should read this Guidance alongside the General Guide to the Arts Council of Wales Lottery Programme and our Capital Strategy 2012-2017.

If you are looking for information to help you fill in your Application Form(s), please read the relevant Funding Help Notes.

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The Three Stage Application Process

Major capital projects are complex and your project will move through a minimum of three stages before you can begin any building work. We use the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Plan of Work to guide this process. This sets out a sequence of project work stages and defines the content of each stage. You can download the Plan of Work here.

Our experience shows that this staged approach encourages best practice in the planning, procurement, management and delivery of major capital projects.

This diagram shows the three stage application process:

Capital - major - Flowchart

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Our specialist external advisers

We will work with external advisers throughout the process to provide us with independent advice on particular specialist aspects of applications. Our external advisers have been carefully selected following a formal application process and are drawn from a range of professions. They include architects, quantity surveyors, access advisers, business advisers and public art specialists.

An external adviser will be involved in reviewing your completed feasibility study. When you submit your application for full funding a team of external advisers will be appointed to evaluate your application on our behalf. Each member of this team will complete a report on your application, and this will be sent to you so that you can comment on its findings and identify any factual inaccuracies.

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Your Feasibility Study

A feasibility study allows you to establish whether your project is needed (the demand), whether it is technically and financially viable, and whether it is appropriate for your organisation to take the project forward. It is also important at this stage to establish your vision for the project and the benefit to the public that your completed project will bring.

You will need specialist, professional expertise to help you complete your feasibility study. You will usually need to work with an architect and a business advisor, but this will depend on the type of project you are planning. You must make sure that you appoint consultants appropriately. You can read more about what we expect from you

in terms of procurement later in this Guidance.

The complexity and exact content of your feasibility study will vary depending on the size, scale and type of project you are developing. However there should be some consideration of:

  • Initial ideas of the building’s scope and technical specifications
  • Outline capital costs and potential sources of funding
  • Financial implications for your organisation in terms of potential increased revenue needs
  • Organisation implications in terms of capacity and skills to deliver the project, and increased or different staffing needs on completion
  • Programme

When you have completed your feasibility study you will have reached RIBA Stage C. RIBA define this stage as Concept Design.

You can read more about feasibility studies in Building Excellence in the Arts: A Guide for Clients. Jointly produced by Arts Council England and the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE), it provides a useful, step by step overview of creating arts buildings.

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Developing your project

During this stage, your project will develop from the outline plan set out in your feasibility study to a detailed and fully costed proposal. When you have completed this design development work you will have reached RIBA Stage D. RIBA define this stage as Design Development.

This stage will involve the appointment of your full design team, including your architect, quantity surveyor, project manager, mechanical and electrical engineers, and other specialists that your project needs. We want to be involved in the appointment of your design team and will support you through this crucial phase of your project’s development.

We will advise you on the appointment process to ensure it meets our requirements on procurement and that the right team for your project is appointed. You can read more about procurement later in this Guidance.

The documents you will develop with your design team during this stage of work will form the basis of your application for full funding. It will also provide you with the information required to support an application for full planning permission, which you should be working on at this time.

On completion of Stage D, you and your design team will have reached agreement on the layout, size, shape and appearance of your building. You will have the following information:

  • an architect’s written description of the scheme and design intentions
  • a site plan showing general layout including position and size of the building, access for vehicles and pedestrians, car parking and landscaping areas
  • floor plans at a minimum scale of 1:100 showing the internal layout of the building
  • dimensions (length, width and height) of all the main spaces in the building
  • an outline specification of the work and materials (particularly important in refurbishment and adaptation projects)
  • a schedule of accommodation and floor areas to be provided
  • a detailed cost plan covering construction costs, fees, furniture and fittings
  • a full sustainability assessment and environmental impact statement
  • recommendations on which further consultants will be needed and estimated fees for these
  • recommendations on how to proceed towards construction, including a programme for the next stages, further approvals needed (planning permission for example) and proposed method of selecting a contractor
  • knowledge of the client’s duties under the Construction (Design and management) Regulations 1994 (known as CDM Regulations)
  • a preliminary timetable for remaining pre contract work and construction.

It is important that you are happy with the designs at this stage and that they are approved by your organisation. Attempts to change the designs once Stage D has been approved will be both difficult and costly.

You can read more about design development in Building Excellence in the Arts: A Guide for Clients. Jointly produced by Arts Council England and the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE), it provides a useful, step by step overview of creating arts buildings.

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Our Requirements for Major Capital Projects

We have a set of requirements for major capital projects which we expect you to consider at all stages of your project’s development, from feasibility study onwards. These requirements have implications for your project’s budget and timetable, so you should consider them carefully from the outset.

You will be able to tell us how you have thought about our requirements in the project proposal that you will write for each of your applications to us.

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Environmental sustainability

We will expect you to consider environmental sustainability in the design and construction of your project and in the way in which you will operate your building on its completion. You must consider the environmental impact of your project. If you identify that your project will have a negative impact, you must tell us what steps you will take to mitigate this.

You must aspire to achieve low carbon and low waste solutions, as far as is possible, and aim to minimise energy usage. In so doing, you should aim to maximise the use of renewable and/or more sustainable energy. This includes considering operational approaches to environmental management, (such as a "switch off" policy amongst staff and "green tariff" procurement), and the installation of sustainable technologies. You may find the information in Energising Culture: A Guide to Future Energy for Cultural Buildings, written by the organisation Julie’s Bicycle, useful.

As far as is possible we will expect you to use sustainable materials. These are materials that are recycled, renewable and which have low embodied energy. You should also think about using materials that are locally sourced and recycling and reusing materials created by any demolition work or by other phases of the construction work. Non-renewable materials should be used as sparingly as possible.

You must consider your approach to waste management and pollution, and aim to minimise this through operational policies, both during the construction phase and following completion of the project.

You should also consider the travel and transport implications of your project and where possible encourage the use of public transport, cycle routes and look to minimise car usage.

We know that implementing measures to increase the environmental sustainability of your project will impact on its cost. You must consider the whole-life cost of your project and justify how a higher initial capital outlay will result in longer-term savings on revenue costs.

We will expect you to demonstrate your approach to environmental sustainability throughout your project’s development. You should undertake a sustainability assessment as part of your design development work at Stage D.

As part of your application for full funding you must demonstrate to us a long-term operational policy that embeds sustainable practice within your organisation. The form that this takes and its content will depend on your organisation and the type and scale of your project, but you should consider issues such as the provision of training in the use of newly installed sustainable technologies, operational approaches to saving energy, waste management and recycling, travel policies for staff etc.

We will expect all our projects to achieve a BREEAM Very Good rating, as a minimum. (BREEAM is the leading design and assessment method for sustainable buildings. It provides an holistic approach to measuring and improving all types of existing and new buildings, by assessing their long-term environmental impact). All new buildings will be expected to achieve a BREEAM excellent rating, and to use 10% materials that are recycled / renewables.You may find the RIBA Green Overlay to its Plan of work will help you fully integrate sustainability into the design process.

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Quality of design and construction

We expect that your project will achieve high standards of design and construction. Arts buildings can be complex, and you must show us that the planning and design, as well as your method of procurement for construction works, will deliver a building which is fit for purpose.

Good design stems from having a strong design brief in place that shapes the design process. This in itself needs you to have a clear vision for what you want your project to achieve. You should think carefully about your project’s vision as you work on your feasibility study, and revisit it as your project develops to ensure you are not changing the scope or focus of your project.

Good design is both sustainable and accessible. We have already explained our expectations for the way in which you address environmental sustainability in your project. We will also expect accessibility to inform all aspects of your design in order that your project provides an equitable quality of experience for all people. We encourage you to go beyond the requirements of current legislation when thinking about accessibility. We will however expect you to carry out an independent access audit as part of your design development work and to show us how you have addressed its findings.

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Procurement

Procurement means the way that you buy the goods, services and work needed to deliver your project. It covers all of the appointments you will make, for example your design team and your building contractor, and also the way that you buy any new equipment for your project.

You must comply with all current public regulation procurement laws that apply to your organisation and your project when buying goods and services.

Some large and / or public sector projects, or projects which receive significant amounts of public sector funding will be covered by European Union (EU) procurement rules. This means that notification of your intention to make an appointment must be included in the Official Journal of the European Union (OJEU).

Financial thresholds are used to establish when a project is considered of a significant enough scale for it to require notification in OJEU. These thresholds can change. You can find out the current financial thresholds by clicking here.

You must be clear from the outset of the scope of all of the appointments you will make.

For example, are you intending to make individual appointments to the design team, or to recruit a design team in one go? (In other words, will you advertise for an architect and other consultants separately and then bring them together to form your design team, or will you advertise for a design team as a whole? Architects often have other consultants with whom they like to work, and will propose these other professionals in their submission to you).

You must also be clear from the outset as to the duration of appointments. For example, are you looking to appoint an architect for the feasibility study alone, or do you intend for that initial team to stay with the project until completion? The financial thresholds that govern procurement apply to the total fee a consultant will receive, so you must be sure about this issue in order to know that you are adhering to the correct procurement legislation.

You must ensure that you allow sufficient time for all appointments to be made, and build this time into your project’s programme.

Regardless of the procurement process that you adopt, you must be able to show us, at all stages of your project’s development, that you have followed procedures that are fair, competitive and auditable and that meet the relevant legislation.

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Working with artists and craftspeople

We expect you to work with artists and craftspeople as part of your major capital project.

Artists and craftspeople can contribute to your project in different ways. It is important that you are clear about the role you would like artists to have in your project and that you make sure they are well briefed and given sufficient time to complete what is being asked of them.

When working with artists and craftspeople we expect you to follow recognised best practice. We can give you more information about this.

In order to maximise their contribution to your project, you should involve artists and craftspeople at the earliest possible opportunity in your project’s development.

Artists and craftspeople can contribute a valuable added dimension to your project from the outset (as part of your feasibility study). For example, they can become integral members of your design team, helping develop the scheme’s vision and its key design concepts as well as identifying opportunities for integrated artworks. We strongly recommend that you appoint an artist to your design team. This can happen as early as the feasibility stage of your project. At the very least, we will expect to see you working with an artist as part of your design team during the design development phase of your project.

Artists and craftspeople can also take part in stakeholder consultation and community engagement.

We expect artwork to form part of your project on its completion. We require that at least 1% of the full project cost is included in your Stage D cost plan for the commissioning of artwork(s).

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Organisational health check

Good governance is vital to the success of your project. We know that planning and delivering a major capital project can put pressure on your organisation if you are not fully prepared. You also need to ensure the health of your organisation is maintained so that when your project is completed you are in a strong position to manage your building operationally and to take full advantage of new opportunities that arise.

You must use the planning and development of your major capital project to review your organisation’s capacity skills and experience. You should assess the strengths and weaknesses of your Board or Management Committee, as well as of your staff and volunteers. You may find the principles set out in the Wales Council for Voluntary Action (WCVA) Good Governance: A code for the third sector in Wales, a useful starting point for this review.

Taking responsibility for a major capital project can prove too much work for one person within an organisation, particularly if they are a volunteer Board member, or a member of staff with existing responsibilities.

We require you to set up a dedicated management group which has collective responsibility for overseeing your project and monitoring its progress. This group must meet regularly throughout the project, usually monthly, and must have agreed terms of reference so that there is clarity as to its role and level of responsibility. It should also have clear lines of reporting to your Board and Management Committee and be empowered by your governing body to make decisions to an agreed level of accountability.

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Independent project management

We require you to appoint an appropriately qualified, independent building professional, with professional indemnity insurance, to act as your project manager to manage the construction phase of your project.

Even if your organisation, Board Members, or members of staff have experience of building projects, an independent project manager will bring essential skills and experience to your project, and help prevent conflicts of interest arising.

The project manager will be your representative, so you must feel confident that you can develop a positive working relationship with the person you appoint to this role. They must have a clear remit which sets out the level of authority they have to make key decisions on the project.

It is likely that their role will involve helping you co-ordinate the project team, and helping ensure your project is delivered as you expect it to be, on time and to budget. They will help manage any changes required and manage risk, as well as managing the expectations and sometimes conflicting viewpoints of key stakeholders and partners.

We know that appointing an independent project manager will increase the cost of your project, but our experience of other major capital projects shows that they are vital to their success. You can include the cost of independent project management in your application for full funding.

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Financial Planning

As well as designing your building and planning its construction, you must give serious consideration to financial planning. You must show us how you will meet the cost of your project and also whether it will have an impact on your long-term revenue needs.

We want our Capital Lottery funding to help our key arts organisations become more financially sustainable. If you think that your completed project will have an impact on your long-term revenue needs, you, and all your stakeholders, should give this full consideration at the earliest possible stage in your project’s development. You cannot include these costs within your application for full funding, and you should not assume that we will make any contribution to these costs from other sources of funding available to us.

Your business plan will show us how well you have considered the long term impact of your project on your organisation’s viability. One of our specialist advisers will review your business plan as part of the assessment process.

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If we award you a grant

We have to make sure that the building and equipment are used for the purposes you said they would be in your applications. We also must have measures in place to protect our investment should something go wrong. So, if you are successful and we award you full funding, we will work with you to put in place certain legal requirements. These will include a legal contract and a legal charge. A legal charge is a form of security that will link your building (the capital asset) to us (the Arts Council), so that if you default on any of the terms of conditions associated with your grant, we have the legal right to pursue the recovery of the grant from the capital asset.

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Monitoring your project

We monitor the projects we are funding to ensure that Lottery funding is being used as effectively as it can be, and that it is benefiting as many people as possible.

During the design development stage of your project we will hold regular progress meetings with you. During the construction phase of your project we will have monthly monitoring meetings with you which will be attended by an Arts Council officer and at least one other professional, external adviser. That these meetings take place will be a requirement of the legal contract we will have with you.

Our experience shows that these progress and monitoring meetings can significantly benefit your project. Our intention in all our meetings with you is to support your organisation and to be constructive, working with you to help ensure the successful delivery of your project.

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Useful Organisations and Publications

The following organisations and publications may be able to provide you with information that will help you develop and deliver your major capital project. We are providing these details for information only. By doing so we are not endorsing any of these organisation and we are not responsible for the content of external websites, publications produced by other organisations, or for the advice you may receive from them.

Please be aware that we will not recommend specific consultants, organisations or suppliers to work with you on your project.

Environmental sustainability

Organisations

BREEAM (Building Research Establishment Assessment Method)

http://www.breeam.org/

BREEAM is the leading design and assessment method for sustainable buildings. It provides an holistic approach to measuring and improving all types of existing and new buildings, by assessing their long-term environmental impact.

The Welsh Government has adopted BREEAM as its preferred tool to assess how sustainable development in Wales is being implemented.

Business in the Community Wales

http://www.bitc.org.uk/wales/index.html

Business in the Community is a business led charity that focuses on promoting responsible business practice. It works with companies to help them integrate responsible business practices and connect them with the local community to tackle social and environmental issues.

Carbon Trust

http://www.carbontrust.co.uk

The Carbon Trust provides specialist support to help business and the public sector boost business returns by cutting carbon emissions, saving energy and commercialising low carbon technologies.

Centre for Alternative Technology / Canolfan y Dechnoleg Amgen

http://www.cat.org.uk/

The Centre for Alternative Technology (CAT) aims to inspire, inform, and enable people to live more sustainably. It has a visitor centre and provides a free information service as well as educational and consultancy services

Centre for Regeneration Excellence in Wales (CREW)

http://regenwales.org/

The Centre for Regeneration Excellence in Wales promotes integrated regeneration throughout Wales by sharing experience, good practice and regeneration skills across all the professions that contribute to the regeneration process. Its website provides a range of tools and resources on the subject of regeneration.

Cynnal Cymru-Sustain Wales

http://www.cynnalcymru.com/

Cynnal Cymru-Sustain Wales is a membership organisation that promotes sustainable development and raises awareness of good practice within Wales.

Julie’s Bicycle

http://www.juliesbicycle.com/

Julie’s Bicycle is a non-profit making company that works across the arts and creative industries helping to make environmental sustainability intrinsic to the business, art and ethics of the music, theatre and creative industries.

Julie’s Bicycle offers practical advice, tools, resources and Industry Green environmental certification, informed by world-leading research into the environmental impacts of the creative industries.

HM Government, Scottish Executive, Welsh Assembly Government, Northern Ireland Office
One Future – Different Paths: The UK’s shared framework for sustainable development

http://www.sd-commission.org.uk/publications.php?id=215

The framework sets out an agreed set of shared principles relating to sustainable development.

Welsh Government / Llywodraeth Cymru
Sustainable Development

http://wales.gov.uk/topics/sustainabledevelopment/?lang=en

This sets out the Welsh Government’s commitment to sustainable development. It provides information on policy and initiatives as well as resources such as case studies and publications, and information of funding and grants.

Publications

The following are all available to download from the Julie’s Bicycle website:
Energising Culture: A Guide to Future Energy for Cultural Buildings

http://www.juliesbicycle.com/resources/publications/energising-culture

This guide aims to set out the issues around energy demand, energy supply and the related implications for business models. It considers how you can make informed decisions about long-term energy strategies for arts buildings and provides technical guidance on topics such as energy data collection and analysis and how to consider your energy usage as part of a major refurbishment.

Green Theatre Guide

http://www.juliesbicycle.com/resources/green-guides/greentheatreguide

Written by the Mayor of London’s Culture Office, the guide is for anyone in the theatre industry, and offers practical and effective ways to reduce energy use and make theatres greener, while also saving money.

Green Visual Arts Guide

http://www.juliesbicycle.com/resources/green-guides/green-visual-arts-guide

Another of the Mayor of London's series of Green Creative Industry Guides for London, the Green Visual Arts Guide is a ‘how-to’ for visual arts organisations, individuals and galleries interested in greening their activities.

Environmental Policy and Action Plan Guidelines

http://www.juliesbicycle.com/resources/environmental-policy-guidelines

Guidelines to help you develop your own Environmental Policy and Action Plan.

Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)
Green Overlay to the RIBA Outline Plan of Work

http://www.ribabookshops.com/item/green-overlay-to-the-riba-outline-plan-of-work/10005/

The Green Overlay to the RIBA Outline Plan of Work aims to provide a framework for better embedding sustainability into the appraisal, briefing, design and construction process. It can be downloaded for free from the RIBA online bookshop.

Welsh Government / Llywodraeth Cymru
One Wales: One Planet
The Sustainable Development Scheme of the Welsh Assembly Government, May 2009

http://wales.gov.uk/topics/sustainabledevelopment/publications/onewalesoneplanet/?lang=en

This sets out how the Welsh Government intends to promote sustainable development across the areas for which it has responsibility. It covers sustainable resource use, sustainability and the economy, society and the environment, and wellbeing.


Quality of design and construction

Organisations: Design, Architecture and Professional Bodies

Association of British Theatre Technicians (ABTT)

http://www.abtt.org.uk/about.htm

The Association of British Theatre Technicians (ABTT) campaigns on behalf of the theatre industry to ensure legislation is appropriate to the industry’s needs, and that regulations are suitably drafted and enforced.

ABTT has a Theatre Planning Committee which aims to provide impartial advice at planning stage to improve the design and technical standards of new or refurbished performing arts buildings of any size.

CADW

http://cadw.wales.gov.uk/

Cadw is the Welsh Government’s historic environment service working for an accessible and well-protected historic environment for Wales.

Design Commission for Wales / Comisiwn Dylunio Cymru

http://dcfw.org/

The Design Commission for Wales aims to champion high standards of architecture, landscape and urban design in Wales, promoting wider understanding of the importance of good quality in the built environment, supporting skill building, encouraging social inclusion and sustainable development.

Design Council / Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE)

http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/

The Design Council merged with the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) in 2011. It aims to promote design and architecture for the public good.

Part of CABE’s work has been incorporated into the Design Council, and is known as Design Council CABE http://www.designcouncil.org.uk/our-work/CABE/. Design Council CABE is committed to raising the quality of the built environment and to supporting local communities to help them deliver and shape place that meet their needs.

CABE’s original website has been selected for preservation by the National Archives, and still contains a wealth of useful information. http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/20110118095356/http:/www.cabe.org.uk/

Landscape Institute

http://www.landscapeinstitute.org/

The Landscape Institute is the Royal Chartered body for landscape architects. It works to protect, conserve and enhance the natural and built environment for the benefit of the public, and is committed to improving the planning, design and management of urban and rural landscape.

Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)

http://www.architecture.com/

RIBA is the professional association of architects in the UK. It champions better buildings, communities and the environment through architecture and our members.

Royal Society of Architects in Wales (RSAW)

The Royal Society of Architects in Wales (RSAW) is constituted as the regional organisation of RIBA.

http://www.architecture.com/RegionsAndInternational/UKNationsAndRegions/Wales/RSAW.aspx

Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS)

http://www.rics.org/uk

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) is the membership organisation for professionals working in the land, property and construction sectors.

RICS Wales

http://www.rics.org/site/scripts/documents_info.aspx?categoryID=486&documentID=247&pageNumber=1

RICS Wales was established to meet the needs of the Welsh Government and to ensure a surveying voice was heard on issues affecting land, property, construction and increasingly the environment.

Organisations: Access

Centre for Accessible Environments

http://www.cae.org.uk/

The Centre for Accessible Environments (CAE) provides advice and resources on inclusive design and access to the built environment for older people and disabled people.

Disability Rights UK

http://www.radar.org.uk

Disability Rights UK is a new organisation created in 2012 by the merger of the Royal Association for Disability and Rehabilitation (RADAR), Disability Alliance and the National Centre for Independent Living. It aims to be the largest national pan-disability organisation led by disabled people.

Disability Wales

http://www.disabilitywales.org/

Disability Wales is the national association of disabled people's organisations, striving to achieve the rights, equality and independence of disabled people in Wales. Its website has a section on creating access to the built environment.

Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC)

http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/

The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) has a statutory remit to promote and monitor human rights; and to protect, enforce and promote equality across the nine "protected" grounds - age, disability, gender, race, religion and belief, pregnancy and maternity, marriage and civil partnership, sexual orientation and gender reassignment.

National Register of Access Consultants

http://www.nrac.org.uk/

The National Register of Access Consultants (NRAC) is an independent register of accredited Access Auditors and Access Consultants who meet professional standards and criteria established by a peer review system. It is a UK-wide accreditation service for individuals who undertake access auditing and access consultancy

Wales Council for the Blind

http://www.wcb-ccd.org.uk/

Wales Council for the Blind is the umbrella agency representing the third sector within the visual impairment sector in Wales. It works to campaign, lobby and support the improvement of services to people with a visual impairment

Wales Council for Deaf People

http://www.wcdeaf.org.uk/

Wales Council for Deaf People is the major voluntary body in Wales concerned with deafness. It is an umbrella organisation of associations, both voluntary and statutory, working in the field of hearing loss and representing people who are deaf, deafened, hard of hearing or deaf/blind.

Publications: Design, Architecture and Professional Bodies

Arts Council England / Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment
Building Excellence in the arts: a guide for clients

http://www.artscouncil.org.uk/publication_archive/building-excellence-in-the-arts-a-guide-for-clients/

Jointly produced by Arts Council England (ACE) and Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE). It provides a useful, step by step overview of creating arts buildings.

Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)
RIBA Outline Plan of Work 2007, (with 2009 corrigenda)

http://www.ribabookshops.com/item/riba-outline-plan-of-work-2007-updated-including-corrigenda-issued-january-2009/100004/

The RIBA Outline Plan of Work set out step-by-step the process of working with an architect to design and deliver a capital project. It can be downloaded for free from the RIBA online bookshop.

Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA)
Green Overlay to the RIBA Outline Plan of Work

http://www.ribabookshops.com/item/green-overlay-to-the-riba-outline-plan-of-work/10005/

The Green Overlay to the RIBA Outline Plan of Work aims to provide a framework for better embedding sustainability into the appraisal, briefing, design and construction process. It can be downloaded for free from the RIBA online bookshop.

Royal Institute of British Architects
A Client’s Guide to Engaging an Architect

http://www.ribabookshops.com/

A RIBA guide designed to provide you with all the information you need to hire and work with an architect. It is available to buy from the RIBA online bookshop.

Welsh Government / Llywodraeth Cymru

http://wales.gov.uk/topics/planning/policy/ppw/;jsessionid=vzZ7QR9ZB2tgyQvLZTL3nvv4yhQvNfLRFmymJMhP5ylLZS1mr728!-992767704?lang=en

Planning Policy Wales, Edition 4, February 2011

Planning Policy Wales provides the policy framework for the effective preparation of local planning authorities’ development plans.

Publications: Access

The Equality Act 2010

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2010/15/contents

The Equality Act bans unfair treatment and helps achieve equal opportunities in the workplace and in wider society.

BS 8300: 2009 + A1 2010 Design of Buildings and their approaches to meeting the needs of disabled people

http://shop.bsigroup.com/en/ProductDetail/?pid=000000000030217421

Offering best practice recommendations, this standard explains how architectural design can help disabled people make the most of their surroundings

Working with artists and craftspeople

Organisations

ixia

http://ixia-info.com/

ixia is the UK wide public art think tank based in Birmingham. It provides guidance on the role of art in the public realm. ixia carries out research, supports events and delivers training, and commissions new writing and publications.

ixia also manages Public Art Online, http://www.publicartonline.org.uk, which is an excellent source of information, case studies and resources relating to art in the public realm.

Organisation health check

Publications

Wales Council for Voluntary Action (WCVA)
Good Governance: A Code for the third sector in Wales

http://www.wcva.org.uk/images_client/publication/WCVA%20Good%20Governance%20Guide_E%20(5).pdf

The purpose of the 6 key principles set out in the Code are to assist board members to provide strong leadership, enhance their decision making and demonstrate their accountability.

Wales Council for Voluntary Action (WCVA)
Faith and Hope don’t run charities (trustees do)

http://www.wcva.org.uk/all/dsp_Pub_list.cfm?Publicationid=1436&catid=0

This handbook aims to help trustees deal with their management responsibilities including strategic planning, being accountable for the development of the organisation, managing people and finances, and making decisions in the interest of the voluntary organisation.

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Registered Charity Number 1034245